The Three Most Important Things To Look For When Buying A Helmet For Kids

Feb 16, 2021

We want to make it easy for you to choose the best helmet for your kids. Therefore, we’ve made a short bullet list down below where you can find all the tips we present in this article. If you’d like to know why we recommend these three things (there could be more but these are arguably the most important), read on.

Evaluate A Few Of The Incredible Ingredient Brands On The Market

Several brands have seen the need for smart solutions in the outdoor, adventure, and construction industries during the last few years. Nowadays big companies started as startups only a few years ago but grew very fast thanks to the market need. Think MIPS, Koroyd, and others.

These companies made it safer and easier than ever before to explore our globe, and for that, we thank them.

When you think about buying a helmet for your kid, be sure to read on about these ingredient brands. Most people have heard of MIPS and their patented impact technology. It works by changing the forces in a fall from rotational forces to linear forces.

Linear forces are much less worrisome because the chances of creating Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a lot less than rotational forces. Our brain is sensitive, and rotational impacts can twist it in irreparable ways.

Therefore, we’d argue that one of the most important things you can do when buying a ski helmet is to buy MIPS. In an impact, nothing matters more than keeping your head safe. If the brain is damaged, no matter how fast rescue personnel can arrive at the crash site, nothing will help save it.

Never Change The Appearance Of The Helmet

When you buy a helmet for kids, it’s easy to allow him or her to cover the helmet with add ons, like cameras, stickers, extra goggles, drone attachments, and so forth from the world’s greatest brands. Don’t.

A lot of people see professional skiers wear helmets filled with extras and use that as the argument for it being okay to do the same. Nothing could be further from the truth.

To understand why, we ought to understand how helmets are made. Each helmet goes through a rigorous process of testing and safety protocols. No helmet can be made without extreme precision. No brand would allow it, because if only one helmet is made in the wrong way and the person who wears that helmet falls, that brand will attract a lot of bad attention.

So the helmets are made to be safe as they are. Not with extras that changes its looks and point of gravity. As soon as the helmet has been compromised, either by a fall on it or something attached to it, it’s worth throwing it away and investing in a new one. Your future self will thank you if you ever fall on your head again. Otherwise, the helmet maker can’t guarantee that it’s safe to use it.

You wouldn’t use a boat that might not have holes in it, right? So, why use a helmet that might be safe?

To answer the earlier argument though, professionals can put extra things on their helmets because of just that, they are professional athletes. They know exactly what and where they can change their helmet. Also, do you think any brand that is sponsoring the athlete would allow him or her to change the helmet without them testing it again? Probably not. 

Using stickers and other things is great PR for athletes, so clearly, the brands will make sure they can use it safely. You (probably) don’t have the experience nor the network to ensure your little son or daughter is still safe if they can change the visual and physical characteristics of the helmet.

Make Sure That If An Accident Happens, You’re Well Prepared

As soon as an accident happens, the clock starts ticking. If the brain is impaired, the time from impact to long-term consequences is not great.

You want to be sure that the first person who finds your son or daughter knows exactly what to do. 

You want them to call rescue services and guide them to the point of impact, first and foremost. However, the time it takes to get there and then try to understand what needs to be done might be too long. That’s why, if you’ve bought a helmet that can save all necessary information about your child, the first person on the site can inform the rescue personnel through the phone about everything they need to know even before they arrive.

Say, for example, your son has diabetes and has forgotten to take his insulin shot, as he’s had so much fun during the day with his friends on the slope? No worries, the first person can inform rescue personnel on the way exactly that, so they can make everything ready before they arrive.

Or, what if your son is lost on the slopes. He’s nowhere to be found, and you’ve already skied far away from the last place you know he was at. What do you do? Well, if you had entered your contact details into your twICEme® equipped gear, you’d be in for a good start. As soon as someone found your son, they could tap the twICEme® logo and call you right away. Easy as pancakes.

twICEme® is on a mission to create a global standard of vital information, and the ski industry is perfect for that. Through ICAR, most overarching mountain rescuers and ski patrols know about our rescue technology. Guides use it to a large extent. Or, they don’t regularly use it but when they need to, they’re grateful it exists.

Why should you get a helmet with twICEme®️ Technology integrated into it? Well, here are a few reasons:

Lastly, we want to address a few questions people have asked us recently. 

“Why isn’t blood group available as a choice when storing my information? I'd say that’s a pretty vital thing for rescue personnel to know about?”

You’re right. And since we developed this product together with rescue personnel, we know what information they need, and what they’ll never rely on from the outside sources. 

Blood group is one of the things they’ll always check as they arrive at the hospital if needed. 

Imagine the tragedy if an ambulance comes to the accident, are told by the mother that her son has the blood group “0” and trust her, only to see the son pass away after the injection of blood. She was wrong. 

That can never happen.

How often should I change my children’s helmets?

Well, if you read the article on helmets.org we linked to above, you might already know the answer to that. They argue, which is information gathered from brands themselves, which (most often) are very professional on matters like this.

You should at least change their helmets every 2-4 years. Unless the helmet has been hit or compromised in any way.

So, with that being said, we’d change a child’s helmet every 2 years. 

Why? Because they fall a lot, are not very careful about their helmet (so it probably falls on the ground several times a year), and grow very fast. That includes their head-size. 

Our recommendations for the best ski helmets for kids as of 2021

Down below you can find our recommendations, based on our extensive experience and research, on the best ski helmet for kids. We’ve only chosen helmets with MIPS or some other rotational technology built into them, because of its exceptional necessity on a helmet.

Everest Slope with a MIPS integration
Everest Slope with a MIPS integration
POCito Fornix twICEme
POCito Fornix with twICEme integration


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